Thursday, April 22, 2010

The Velvet Underground • 1969 Live with Lou Reed, Vols. 1 & 2

Another reissue on account of Record Store Day 2010, 1969 Live with Lou Reed comes in two separate volumes, both on vinyl only. These 180-gram pressings are very nice, with deluxe gatefold covers, handy black insert to protect you and the kiddies from the DRAWING of the closeup of a lady's tight behind on the cover, and are sealed for added security.

The Velvet Underground had splintered by 1969 and their initial glory was waning, thanks to all sorts of reasons. In fact, the dubious birth of these two live releases, stemming from shows in Dallas and San Francisco in the fall of '69, is only the start—by the time these actually came out in 1974 the band had already disappeared. The quality of the recordings is pretty good, though, apparently having been done by some hardcore VU fans with decent gear. The playing is a little less exciting. I'm not sure if this is quintessentially what one of the band's shows sounded like or not, having been but a wee boy of six at the time, but I can see how some people wonder what all that hot fuss is about. Now, before you scream "SACRILEGE!" and hold your fingers up in a cross at me, let me just say that I think Lou Reed's songwriting is really something else. I can appreciate the band for many reasons; unfortunately, there are some pretty good reasons why they're not in my Top Ten. For starters: Nico. Good God, Andy Warhol, what in the hell were you thinking? I don't care how good looking she was, that woman couldn't sing her way out of a wet paper bag. Put her in a fucking go-go cage without a mic and she's alright, but please don't let her sing. Second: Lou's singing. This man isn't God's gift to vocals either. And this is coming from a guy who likes Elvis Costello! Third: Guitars are almost always out of tune, even on the studio albums. Having bitched that, I don't dislike the Velvets.

But enough of my Marty DiBergi-esque yakkin'! These two live albums, containing songs from the two aforementioned shows, are a great document of the band at the time. The song selection is quite good, too, even featuring some that Lou would go on to record solo, plus a nice cross section of the band's discography up to that time. Big fans may already have these, true, but the nice pressings are worth the cost, Volume 1 is on white vinyl, and they're supposedly quite limited. So if you see 'em, pick 'em up. Disregard my comments if you have no idea what I could be talking about, and if you, like, totally dig what I'm puttin' down, then leave 'em for those who will appreciate them more.
3/5 (Mercury/ORG)

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