Wednesday, January 27, 2010

The Clash • Cut the Crap

Saw a very nice copy of The Clash's 1985 swansong, Cut the Crap, at one of my favorite record shops the other day. I didn't have a copy of this record—the only one I was missing by the only band that matters—so I picked it up. Now, you may remember the reviews of this final album under that storied band name from when it came out, and they were uniformly bad. Not B.A.D., as in the band Mick Jones started with Don Letts after he was kicked out of his own band (and who were a better group than the one on this record), but C.R.A.P.

Joe Strummer, bless his populist little heart, decided to carry on under the name he helped promote to #1 Punk Band in the Land, recruited some young punks (no new boots or contracts), and cut an album of new generation singalongs. A few of these songs aren't that bad, including the two singles "This Is England" and the severely misguidedly-titled "We Are the Clash," neither of which charted very high. Part of the problem here is that Strummer co-wrote the tunes not with his old mates in the band (or even the new ones), but former Clash manager Bernie Rhodes. Some songs retain a bit of the old grit and go the band once had, but let's face it, this one was not helped by BR's input. Basically, it's the arrangements and the constant "everybody sing with me!" choruses that wear on you.

Clearly, Strummer must've felt he had something to prove when he undertook this record. Despite the fact that The Clash had Top 10 hits everywhere, had successfully toured the globe in support of their 1982 Combat Rock album, and had garnered more great reviews than any punk band ever, he's definitely giving it his all here. "This Is England" ain't half-bad, "Movers and Shakers" and "North and South" is alright, too, but overall, you can't really listen to this one much. And that may be why, when in the early '90s a box set of the band's work was released, mysteriously this record's name is missing from the band discography and not one cut from it appears on any of the three discs. I like to think that maybe even those few years later Strummer realized that he'd sullied his band's name and decided to try and forget the past. In the late '90s all of the band's albums were remastered and reissued—all except this one. I guess they really did cut the crap.
2/5 (Epic FE 40017, 1985)

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